USPSTF Recommendation and Implementation for Prevention and treatment for Diabetes and Obesity

USPSTF

The U.S. Preventive Services Task force is an independent group of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine that works to improve the health of all Americans by making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screenings, counseling services, and preventive medications.

DiabetesHeader

2 out of 3 people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke

2 out of 3 people with diabetes die of heart disease or stroke1.

Heart USPSTF

According to the CDC, up to
20%
of deaths are from heart attack

Brain USPSTF

and
13%
of deaths from strokes are related to diabetes or prediabetes

Evidence- Based Recommendations

The following conclusions were reached by the USPSTF after a thorough review of current scientific research

For prevention and treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

Intensive lifestyle and pharmacotherapeutic interventions reduce the progression of prediabetes to diabetes.

  • Delaying the onset of diabetes would substantially reduce the incidence of vascular complications, improve quality of life, and avoid future medical costs 1.
  • Several recent observational studies and a meta-analysis suggest an association between chronic hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease and stroke 2-5.
  • If a screening program was implemented to target persons at risk for diabetes, subsequent treatment for persons with impaired glucose tolerance with lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions is a good use of resources 1.

For prevention and treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

Recommends screening all adults for obesity. Persons with a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher should be referred to an intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions.

  • Evidence shows that intensive programs that include a variety of activities are successful in helping people manage their weight. These programs:
    • Include 12 to 26 sessions in the first year
    • Include group and/or individual sessions
    • Help people make healthy eating choices
    • Include physical activity
    • Address issues that make it difficult to change behaviors
    • Help people monitor their own behaviors
    • Help people develop strategies to maintain healthy eating and physical activity

USPSTF Recommendations and Inspire Delivers

50%

of adults have been told to improve their health by physicians

44%

of adults monitor their blood pressure

99%

of Americans need to improve their heart health

72%

of people don’t believe they’re at risk from heart disease

58%

of Americans make no effort to improve cardiovascular health

83%

of Americans believe prevention is possible but take no steps towards it

60%

of adults have no idea what their cholesterol or blood pressure numbers are

Sources

  • 1. Waugh N, Scotland G, McNamee P, Gillett M, Brennan A, Goyder E, et al. Screening for type 2 diabetes: literature review and economic modelling. Health Technol Assess 2007;11:iii-iv, ix-xi, 1-125.
    [PMID: 17462167]
  • 2. Selvin E, Coresh J, Shahar E, Zhang L, Steffes M, Sharrett AR. Glycaemia (haemoglobin A1c) and incident ischaemic stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Lancet Neurol 2005;4:821-6. [PMID: 16297840]
  • 3. Selvin E, Coresh J, Golden SH, Brancati FL, Folsom AR, Steffes MW. Glycemic control and coronary heart disease risk in persons with and without diabetes: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study. Arch Intern Med 2005;165:1910-6. [PMID: 16157837]
  • 4. Selvin E, Marinopoulos S, Berkenblit G, Rami T, Brancati FL, Powe NR, et al. Meta-analysis: glycosylated hemoglobin and cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Ann Intern Med 2004;141:421-31. [PMID: 15381515]
  • 5. Stettler C, Allemann S, Juni P, Cull CA, Holman RR, Egger M, et al. Glycemic control and macrovascular disease in types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus: meta-analysis of randomized trials. Am Heart J 2006;152:27-38. [PMID: 16824829]